Healing Bone Broth!

healing bone broth

Welcome to the wild world of bone broth!

There are huge health benefits to drinking a cup of bone broth a day in my experience— or even an occasional cup of bone broth when you are tired or under-the-weather. It is simple to make, and disarmingly addictive once you feel its power!

Bone broth is thought to be anti-inflammatory.  As inflammation is a major cause of pain in your body, as well as the result of illness and physical imbalance, bone broth can be a simple elixir to calm your body.

If you have IBD or IBS, bone broth is very healing to the digestive system, and is a source of minerals and calcium that are highly-absorbable. It is recommended on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet and the Paleo diet as well.

If you are dehydrated, bone proth is a great electrolyte replenisher. Consider it an amazing sports drink, especially if you can’t have sugar.

Bone broth also feeds you skin, nails and joints.  The natural gelatin in the bones enriches the broth and makes it a real wonder-treatment for your skin and hair.

If you have joint pain or arthritis, bone broth is thought to help reduce the inflammation naturally.

While I am not a doctor and can’t support these health claims in a medical sense, these are all the benefits I have noticed in my own life from drinking this broth.

Now, to make it!

You will need a crock pot or slow cooker to do this well. You can also cook it over a few days, very carefully monitoring your stove (I don’t suggest doing this!). I suggest  using an inexpensive slow cooker that you will find a zillion other uses for once it is in your home!

Simple Bone Broth

  • 2 lbs of organic bones. They can be raw beef marrow bones (organic) or the remains of an organic roasted chicken or bone-in roast.
  • several quarts of water to fill the pot
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • a handfull of carrots, leeks, and celery
  • a bunch of parsley
  • and a generous amount of sea salt (a few tbs, to taste)

Add the bones, water and cider vinegar to your slow cooker or pot.  The vinegar will help extract the goodness from the bones, so try not to skip it.  Some suggest roasting the bones first, but I find it is easier to just put them straight in the pot since this is not a traditional stock.

Set the timer for 24 hours on low.  Yes, 24 hours. I check it periodically even in the slow cooker, but it should just simmer away on very low heat. If you are using a pot on a stove, you may need to add more water periodically and vigilantly monitor it.

Toss in all the veggies except the parsley and set the timer for 11 more hours.  Toss in the parsley now.  Let it go a bit longer (up to an hour).

I let it cool for an hour or two in the pot before straining into a big bowl and pouring into big glass jars for storage. I add the salt now and stir, as it is easier to taste the seasoning when it is a bit cooler.  Disgard all the bones, marrow and cooked-down, nearly-melted veggies.

Since I drink about a cup a day (or more if I am feeling depleted) this goes quite quickly. You can freeze it, though I prefer to use straight-away once I make a batch to have the best of its goodness at its freshest.

Have you ever tried a bone broth before? If you do try it, let me know how it makes you feel…and I hope the answer is… excellent!!! xoxo Dana

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pam October 25, 2014 at 8:00 pm

Do you have to strain the broth? Is 24 hours enough to make a good broth?

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danaclaudat October 25, 2014 at 10:02 pm

I do strain it. And I have done it for 24 hours. But “technically” people say longer… It’s hard for me to always do it longer because without all the windows open the dogs go nuts thinking there’s meat coming for them!!!

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