Are You Waiting For A Miracle???

The word miracle is sooooo over-used that it has got to be scrubbed from New Age-ology.  People run around talking “miracles” at every turn.  You see, if a miracle happens every day, then what is not a miracle?! And how can a real miracle happen if everything is a miracle?  In a sense, it is the most disempowering word to use in every day language.

Life is gorgeous, awe-inspiring, challenging and exciting at its best.  Save the miracles for when you need them.  That’s my two cents on all the “miracle speak”, for, when you think about it, the idea of a miracle at every turn takes YOU out of the equation of your own life and leaves you “waiting” for a “miracle”… and you are too awesome to stand for that!  Now…lets get to work 😉   xoxo Dana

One Man November 20, 2012 at 3:47 am

First of all, I disagree at the outset that the term is being overused to the point of abuse. It is mentioned on occasion, sure, but I wouldn’t say it is regarded as a keystone concept nor a catch phrase of the movement (to the extent that there is coherence and consistency with the movement).

Second, with regard to the idea that “everything is a miracle” (which is not quite the same issue as the term being overused or misused, but more of a optimistically-oriented philosophical perspective and/or tenet), I also disagree that it is disempowering even in the slightest. In my view, it highlights the ability to express gratitude and find the purpose, value, and elegance/beauty in ALL of life’s experiences/creatures etc. When one is able to appreciate everything, they are in essence constantly reaffirming their love, by essentially extending unconditional love to the greater whole. It would indeed be a disempowering and sad life if we only reserved awe, happiness, and appreciation for 1-in-1000 year events, or even annual events. Anything really can seem miraculous when viewed from the right perspective. An ant may seem insignificant and trivial when viewed from 10 feet away, but if you got down with a magnifying glass and watched it methodically slice a leaf and gracefully carry ten times its bodyweight overhead.

Third, who are you to tell others (and why would you want to tell others,) what is or is not a “real” miracle? Is someone being cured of cancer a “real” miracle? It’s happened thousands or perhaps millions of times. Does that make it too common? There are often scientific explanations for it – so does it not count? Does it have to be improbable and if so, how improbable? Does it have to be considered to be impossible? And if so, once it occurs and enters the realm of something that has occurred and therefore must be possible, is it then just as soon deemed not a miracle? Or does it merely need to be inexpicable? As you can see from all of the above, it is, at the core a matter of perspective. Question for you is, wouldn’t you like to see more “miracles” at every turn yourself and cast aside the fear that a mere word’s meaning becomes diluted?

Whatever you choose, it’ll serve a purpose for you, and I hope it brings you joy.

Have a miraculous week! 🙂

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